When everything feels too loud, make sure you're doing this

 
 

When your mind is getting too loud, your intentions blurry and your heart is fluttering with anxiety, ask yourself this question: when was the last time you sat in stillness with yourself?

How often do you actually take time in solitude?

When I say solitude, I mean connecting and listening inward.

But really—how often do you spend time, not alone, not lonely, but solely with yourself, your thoughts and your heart?

Yesterday morning, I met with a few of my favorite coaching ladies for our mastermind call, and it became apparent that every single one of us needed to be taking more time for ourselves.

With the external noise, it becomes easy to forget how much we need this.

Humans need time to be in community, and we also time to need to be alone.

I'll also say, solitude is not the same as loneliness.

Unfortunately, many people seem to think that spending time alone is the harbinger of social isolation, but it's actually a place of true self-satisfaction.

I also don't just mean aloneness. You can have a very active mind and body when no one else is around, without ever really letting yourself rest in stillness.

Unlike generally being alone, solitude is intentional aloneness.

You choose to take time for introspection, and to stay with yourself past the point where you at first feel uncomfortable with the "not doing."

There is a certain spaciousness in solitude, one that allows your mind to open to possibility and true desire.

It is where creativity lives, and where you move past the "should" to what is actually true for you.

So when your world is feeling narrow, decide how to best give yourself this time to just be.

Find the right ways for yourself and do them: time outside, journaling, tarot cards, meditating, sitting and thinking and not doing much of anything at all.

What are your tools for taking the time you need?

And how can you ensure that you actually use them?

Stay wild, get outside and look inward.

Iris Rankin

Soulful questioner, exuberant organizer, here to find the balance between discipline and delicious relaxation. Iris Rankin is the founder of Project Intention, a values-based community focused on living day-to-day with purpose, planning, and heart. Iris encourages women to adopt the self care practices that make them feel divine, the planning tools to hone in on their essential wants and needs, and the emotional resilience to express their most authentic selves.



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